Wednesday, 27 April 2016

Looking at Diebenkorn - 2 Day Workshop in Faversham


Freedom in Painting Workshop with Ashley Hanson

Only 3 Places Remaining!!



Without question Richard Diebenkorn's paintings have influenced many artists working today and during this two day painting workshop we will be using his ideas and methods as a springboard for developing our own paintings.


Dates: Thurs 30 June - Fri 1st July 2016,  9.30 - 5.30pm

Cost:  £80

Venue: Creek Creative, Faversham, Kent. See here for parking and location details.

To Book: email denise@ashleyhanson.co.uk or call 01208 77656





Tuesday, 26 April 2016

Freedom in Painting in Polruan with Ashley Hanson

7th -10th September 2016

The view of Polruan -  just above the Village Hall


 4 Day Course £250, 10 Places Only


We are delighted to introduce this new Freedom in Painting course set in the magical coastal village of Polruan, on the south coast of Cornwall. Your tutor Ashley Hanson is an acclaimed colourist and landscape artist and a member of the Newlyn Society of Artists. Our studio and base for the 4 days is the Village Hall ideally situated, overlooking the Fowey River, with an outside terrace providing a wonderful option to paint outside. There are also glorious panoramic views to the open sea behind. 

The Village Hall Studio

Course Information


The first morning will be spent getting to know Polruan. Ashley will take the group to a number of favourite viewpoints where artists will be encouraged to make studies, collecting information and ideas for paintings back in the studio. Over the 4 days there will be further drawing/painting sessions in Polruan and it's surrounds, including visits to Fowey across the river,(weather permitting).

View from sea level
Elizabeth sketching Polruan

With a combination of group exercises, demonstrations and discussions, Ashley will help artists develop and build on their paintings, finding their own personal interpretation of Polruan. Colour, mark-making, space and composition are all areas that will be explored and by working in a small group, Ashley will be able to offer plenty of one to one tuition. 

Ashley with Hazel Crawford


Cathy's Jeppesen's Polruan painting in progress





















Kate Watkins painting - Private Collection of Bridget Hills
Juliet Neill Hall's painting of Polruan



As with some of our other courses, Ashley will also be working on his own painting and using this as a teaching tool to demonstrate many of his tips and techniques. At the end of the 4 days the group will get the chance to discuss all the work made in a group critique. 


Fowey River 1 - Ashley Hanson


This course is suitable for painters of all abilities who wish to enhance their creativity.

Ashley looks forward to sharing his wide knowledge and passion for colour and oils/acrylics with the group.

Polruan




Your Tutor


Ashley has over 30 years experience as a professional artist. This combined with his teaching as a Visiting Lecturer at Canterbury Christchurch University and the National Academy of Art, Bergen , Norway ensures the teaching you will receive throughout the course will be of the highest standard. In addition he has run many popular and successful workshops of his own around the UK.

Ashley's paintings have been shown nationally and internationally. His work has been selected for thr Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, the Discerning Eye and the National Open art Exhibition. Last year he was short listed for the Connect2Colour Art Prize at Lacey Contemporary Galley in London and he has been a recipient of the Boise Travel Scholarship form the Slade School of Art and is a former prizewinner of the Hunting Art Prizes.

Accommodation


You can find a variety of accommodation options, including bed and breakfast, self-catering and camping in Polruan, see the village website here for further details. Alternatively Coldharbour Farm, in Bodmin (approx 40 minute drive) offers comfortable, affordable accommodation.

To Book


Email denise@ashleyhanson.co.uk or call 01208 77656. A £70 deposit is required at time of booking and the balance is due 8 weeks prior  to the start of the course.

You can view a write up of some of our previous painting holidays and courses here:


For a further insight into Ashley's art see www.ashleyhanson.co.uk and the blog http://ashleyhansonart.blogspot.co.uk


Our Freedom in Painting courses continue to challenge artists of all abilities with many artists returning year after year. Participants often finding they continue to benefit from the tuition and experience long after the course.







Testimonials


Read here for Nicola McLean's write up of our September 2014 Painting Holiday in Discover Art Magazine

A big thank you to Ashley and Denise for a brilliant expereince. Painting with a group of lovely people and guided by someone with so much passion - who could ask for more? Looking forward to doing it again next year.
Hazel Crawford May 2015

I was quite anxious about whether I would be out of my depth but despite the very different experience levels Ashley made us all feel positive.
Philippa Langton May 2015

Thanks to you both for a wonderful painting holiday. It was so well organised and we were made very welcome. It was wonderful to see parts of the beautiful Cornish area and try to combine the feeling of what we saw in our work. I feel inspired by the course and what Ashley has imparted. 
Philippa Hutton May 2015

I arrived with no experience of abstraction. I leave with a new aspect and tool for my painting. It works!
Margarita Hanlon September 2015


Thursday, 21 April 2016

Freedom in Painting in Porthleven with Ashley Hanson

Sat 21- Fri 27 May & Sun 2- Sat 8 October 2016

Bruce Campbell  on April 2015 'Freedom in Painting in Porthleven' Course

5 Day Course in & Additional Exhibition Day £375

This course is a unique opportunity to work in a small group with acclaimed colourist and landscape artist Ashley Hanson, a member of the Newlyn Society of Artists. The studio for the week is in the Old Lifeboat House, in Porthleven, Cornwall, dramatically positioned on the edge of the harbour facing the open sea. Ashley has a very special connection with Porthleven; the paintings of Peter Lanyon (in particular 'Porthleven ' made in 1951) have had a major influence on his work  and this unspoilt fishing town with it's double harbour and iconic clock tower continues to inspire his paintings.


Porthleven 23 - Ashley Hanson

"Image, structure, movement, all the ingredients are here to make paintings. This workshop is an opportunity for artists to explore and respond to it's richness, rawness and complexity. It's a special place for me, - so far there are 24 in the series and each time I revisit there is an abundance of ideas for more."

During the workshop Ashley will inspire and encourage participating artists to produce their own personal interpretation of Porthleven, adding to its rich tradition.



The Old Lifeboat House - Our Studio

Working inside the studio























On the afternoon before the course starts artists have the opportunity to set up their studio space and meet the rest of the group. This is followed by four and a half intense working days in the studio and around the harbour. The group will then help transform the studio into an exhibition space on the afternoon of the fifth day, ready for the Private View later on that evening. The exhibition will continue through to the following day giving the artists an opportunity to show and sell their work.



Course Information


Antonia Glynne- Jones working outside 
Group drawing exercises with Ashley by the harbour














The first morning is spent getting to know Porthleven.  Everyone will be encouraged to make studies  around the harbour, collecting information and ideas for paintings back in the studio. There will be plenty more opportunities for further studies in and around Porthleven during the week.


Jane Crane's drawing and study

On the course there will be a mixture of group exercises, demonstrations and discussions to help artists engage with their paintings and take it somewhere new. Colour , mark-making, space and composition are all areas that will be explored and there will be plenty of opportunity for one to one tuition and mentoring with Ashley.

Ashley mentoring Mitzi Delnevo

Ashley's Painting -  'Porthleven 20'
Ashley will also be working on his own Porthleven painting and using this as a teaching tool to demonstrate techniques and ideas.Our previous groups have found this  an invaluable way to build on their existing knowledge and pick up further tips. At the end of the week the group will get the chance to discuss all the work made in a group critique.







The course is designed for painters who wish to enhance their creativity and look towards abstraction and beyond the representational. Ashley looks forward to sharing his wide knowledge and passion for colour, landscape and oil/acrylic painting with the group.


Erica Shipley's Painting
Bruce Campbell's Painting





Diane Bedser's Painting

Mitzi Delnevo's Painting
Jo Rollnick's Painting















Your Tutor


Ashley has over 30 years experience as a professional artist and this combined with his teaching as a Visiting Lecturer at Canterbury Christchurch University and the National Academy of Art Bergen, Norway ensures the teaching you will receive throughout the course will be of the highest level. In addition he has run many popular and successful workshops of his own around the UK.

Ashley's paintings has been shown nationally and internationally. His work has been selected for the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, the Discerning Eye and the National Open Art Competition. Last year he was short listed for the Connect2Colour Art Prize at Lacey Contemporary Gallery in London and he has been a recipient of a Boise Travel Scholarship from the Slade School of Art and is a former prizewinner of the Hunting Art Prizes.


Accommodation


Porthleven is well equipped with a variety of accommodation options, excellent restaurants and pubs within easy walking distance of the studio.

Above Beach Cottages have a good selection of cottages and can arrange a Sunday to Sunday let on certain properties. Porthleven Holiday Cottages offer a 10% discount, if you advise them you are booking the course. They also have some excellent B& B accommodation in The Artist Loft and once again a 10% discount is available to participants on the course. See also http://www.porthleven-online.com for alternative B& B's and accommodation available.

To Book


Email denise@ashleyhanson.co.uk or call 01208 77656. As their are only 7 places available on each course, early booking is recommended. To secure your place a £70 deposit is required at the time of booking and the balance is due 8 weeks prior to the start of the course.

You can view a write up of some of our previous Porthleven courses here:
October 2015   April 2015
October 2014   April 2014  April 2013

For a further insight into Ashley's art see www.ashleyhanson.co.uk and the blog http://ashleyhansonart.blogspot.co.uk




Ashley with Jane McClement
Our Freedom in Painting courses continue to challenge artists of all levels of all abilities, with many artists returning year after year. Participants often finding they continue to benefit from the tuition and experience long after the course.










Quoted from February 2013 edition of 'The Artist' magazine by editor Dr Sally Bulgin


"Ashley's concern as an artist and teacher, is to unleash the emotional response to the subject matter that enables the painter to take risks, discover a 'personal colour palette that excites' and to provide the fresh vision of Britain's natural beauty that places him within the long tradition set by the masters of the landscape genre."

Testimonials


My third year in  Porthleven and I build on my experiences and art practice. Ashley and Denise give 110% each time - I don't know of other courses where the tutor is as committed as Ashley. His ability to communicate his knowledge and ideas is a great skill.
Jane McClement - October 2015

Ashley has the talent of seeing possibility in everyone's paintings and leaving people empowered.
Bruce Campbell - April 2015

Ashley is a very fine and energetic tutor - plenty of ideas. He sees things in our work that even we don't see! I have been much encouraged and inspired!
Joy Viegas - October 2014

Enjoyed the company and Porthleven which I came to adore. Ashley was the perfect host, artist and tutor! 
Alison Garner - October 2013





Monday, 4 April 2016

A Strange Occurrence - Two Artists, Two Continents....


'Shiro'   Paul Behnke   32x30ins  acrylic on canvas  2016


'City of Glass 55 - (A)'    Ashley Hanson   25x30cms  oil on canvas  2016

When I posted this painting on Facebook recently, as a 'brick' in my recent City of Glass 38- (T.H.E.T.O.W.E.R.O.F.B.A.B.E.L.)', there was A Strange Occurence. After posting,a split-second later appeared this painting by New York artist Paul Behnke. with the uncanny similarity of the triangles. A further co-incidence was that when I made my piece,  I'm sure I had been thinking about a Mali Morris painting that Paul had recently seen in Cuts, Shapes, Breaks and Scrapes, at Seventeen in London and posted on his Blog 'Structure and Imagery'


'And Ashbery'   Mali Morris   24x28cms   acylic on wood panel  2013

Seeing the paintings side by side made me think about our different approaches to painting and colour. In my work, I am happier with a context, my excursions into 'pure' abstraction proving to be a dead-end. The whole 'City of Glass' series is of course inspired by Paul Auster's novel 'The New York Trilogy' and in this painting the parameters were the the size and orientation of  the canvas, a possible connection to the grid of Manhattan, and a choice of 'T' or 'A', the two remaining letters. That is where my triangle came from but the context goes hand in hand with formal considerations during the process. 

I asked Paul about his triangle:

'For my part I'm not concerned with triangles as a form to work with. They come about more as a result of the process and a by product of the overall form I'm depicting. They are stylised elements within and part of that form'


I'm a great admirer of Paul's painting, the grandeur of their design and the scintillating colour.  Again with colour, we have different approaches. In my own work, I am puritanical about the importance of mixing colour, finding colour. I asked Paul about his colour: 'what does colour mean to you? purely formal and instinctive? did I read somewhere that you prefer not to mix colour?'

'Yes, generally I don't mix. only rarely when I need something quick that I can't buy. I think color is all of that even in the same painting. Parts of a form's color can seem formal but color has the capacity to convey an over all mood. Since I have no color choices in mind when I start a piece a color choice is a reaction to a color previously applied - just like painting in general - I make a move then react for or against that move’

With different philosophies behind our art, it is how we use colour that provides the link, its criticality to the piece, sensually and formally, and our searching for those magical colour- relationships, each colour leading to the next....


'City of Glass 38 - (T.H.E.T.O.W.E.R.O.F.B.A.B.E.L.)'  Ashley Hanson 125x150cms 2016


Appropriately, Paul's painting 'Shiro' is part of the IF COLOUR COULD KILL - New Painting from New York City exhibition, curated by Jeff Frederick, at the Salena Gallery, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York which opens 5 April until 29 April:

'Abstract painting is a color delivery device. But when does color become dangerous, even homicidal? If Color Could Kill imagines a world better than the one we live in: one where color is power. The works of these eight painters say Yes in a way that is louder than everyday life. Modern pigments free the painter from the boring colors of nature. This is color too strong to be safely observed by the naked eye, color so intense it overwhelms and electrifies our fragile, vulnerable humanity'  


Paul's work can also be seen in 'Drishti: A Concentrated Gaze' at 1285 Avenue of the Americas Gallery, New York.  April 11 - July 1, 2016.

Wednesday, 23 March 2016

'City of Glass 38 - (T.H.E.T.O.W.E.R.O.F.B.A.B.E.L.)'


APRIL 2

A very short session in the studio- one thought, one tool, one colour, one action, one line....the Tower is complete.  Looking forward to a day off with the family.

The extension of the line works for me, fading out towards the edge....I have really enjoyed making this piece- not least because it has forced me to work in the landscape format and on smaller canvases (25x30cms), where changes can be made very rapidly. While enjoying looking at the Tower, the downside is that each individual brick/letter/canvas is undervalued and hard to see. I think some of the paintings are as good as anything I have done, especially the later canvases so I am going to give each a City of Glass number to recognize their quality. It might take away a bit of the fun of working out the letters but perhaps they are obvious anyway....


City of Glass 56 - (T)

APRIL 1

Reflection: I'm seeing the painting in a different light- it's the New York canyon thing,...fiery sun... it's aerial view and image and a letter and the final brick..Now for the final arrangement...  

A long session in the studio, the Tower is one mark away from completion. The horizontal needs to extend further across the painting, almost to the right edge. It was there but the falling paint took it away.  A necessary subtle, subtle line to counteract all those verticals, a cut or the edge of a blade...



Small painting, big mess...






MARCH 31 p.m.

A looser, more flamboyant painting, I usually have Manhattan on the vertical, but this time I've using the natural 60 degree angle. It's undeniable - I must have been thinking about the terrific Mali Morris painting on Paul Behnke's recent post in Structure and Imagery. Thanks to you both!

Having a look again: leaving the gap between the 2 angled lines of the grid is critical, keeping it open, an entrance to the painting. It's done. 


City of Glass 55 - (A)


MARCH 31

When you look into the nothing what do you see?

I am just enjoying this painting as sensation, colour, peace, that beautiful central divide when i went back in with the colour. In terms of context, the painting is based on a 'real' district of New York, but there is the ambiguity to enjoy of what is water, what is land....

City of Glass 54 - (E)

MARCH 30 

I was seeing these colours in my sleep - in the studio at 5 this morning. Magenta+ Emerald Green + a bit of Hookers Green + White has made 'Lush Lilac' and an orangey Indian Yellow/Cadmium yellow mix. The single line de-flattens the space and offers an escape... two bricks/letters to go...

Went to Charlestown today, to escape from my cave. The Tower was still in my thoughts-  I was looking at mortar between the bricks of the harbour walls!. Love the reduction and the colour and the purity and the emptiness in this latest painting.


MARCH 29

City of Glass 53 - (O)


Q: When is a square not a square?   A: When it is a double-square

The excitement builds getting towards the completion of the Tower, hopefully by the end of the week.

'The building of the Tower became the obsessive , overriding passion of mankind, more important finally than life itself. Bricks became more precious than people. Women labourers did not even stop to give birth to their children; they secured the newborn in their aprons and went right on working' (P: 44, 'The New York Trilogy)     Quite!


MARCH 28

City of Glass 52 - (O)


Denise suggested the colour- scheme for the new 'brick' - pink and pale grey. Might tidy up the bottom and have the circle truly balanced on the line. The circle feels as if it might roll off to the right but maybe that brings a tension to the piece. Imperfect circles are best - Trevor Bell is the master. 


MARCH 26

City of Glass 51 - (W)

'Brick 10' has been a battle - I've just spent five hours in the studio trying stuff out, looking for a stronger, purer painting. I was bugged by being able to see the stretcher behind the paint on the left in (2) and needed to know whether the point of the triangle should touch the bottom of the canvas. I think (2) and the final painting work in different ways but I believe I've made a better painting. (2) is more decorative, busier, but the painting above has a strength in the drawing and the more intriguing space. I particularly like how the purple triangle sits on the line and its relationship with the pale-yellow corner.  The softer edges too against the severity of the scored lines. It's an uncompromising piece. 

The scored line was technically difficult- drawn by hand in one go with no room for error and because of the thickness of the paint, there is was a build up of excess paint around the sides which had to removed afterwards with a knife.  A pure freeing mark- if it went wrong I would have to remake a flat surface again, losing the unique combination of colours and marks underneath. 

Underneath? Where exactly is the line? The not knowing makes the painting interesting. 

The composition and the key elements have remained from the first session (1) The angled paint is critical as it mirrors the angled streets of the district. The purple triangle is a specific detail that cuts the horizontal of the street and of course the 'W' is one of the letters in THETOWEROFBABEL. Within these parameters I've made a painting.

I hope my daughter Faye likes it- she was upset when I started to make changes.  I like how the painting is, I think I can leave it. Like the building of the original Tower of Babel, this piece has become all obsessive - five 'bricks' to go. I have the locations for the remaining letters- lets see what happens. 



MARCH 25 

2

Possibly a new 'brick', maybe make the scratched angled line more precise. Found a new colour, Faye said it was one of those colours you can't name but she has come up with Kinda Cornish as it is a real sea-colour. Triangles (and letters) everywhere in this part of New York. 


1


MARCH 24


 I couldn't wait- I took off the blue paint with a knife allowing the underneath greens to come through. A vertical mark instead of a block of colour. I still need to straighten the edge. I've also taken out the scratched triangle at the bottom to allow the deep,deep violet to flood through the right side. A little bit of crisp drawing at the top of the column brings clarity and a suggestion of architecture....


City of Glass 50 - (T)


A good session- I've been  looking forward to introducing a dark 'brick' into the tower to shake things up. Might put a dark blue glaze over the column on the right to push it back into the painting at the same time simplifying the composition. Got to wait a few days 'til it's dry. I also want to straighten the edge- it was straight but the paint slid off!




MARCH 21-22

I like all three versions but particularly the whimsical feel of the final painting - the spinning wheel of the strange contraption held by the dark line. Just. Denise and Peggy (from Modern Artists Gallery) see a face...Although upright, it is also a 'real' location in New York...

Version 1 is very graphic but I felt the letter was too centered and too obvious. I do like the mysterious dark space though. Version 2 was nearly a contender- very sculptural, very still, pure and austere, but with too much downward movement.



City of Glass 49 - (R)


Version 2


Version 1




MARCH 17


City of Glass 48 - (E)


The version below was too static, the letter too blatant. The purple line, above, weighted at the bottom, the tiny-angled purple line, and some vertical brushstrokes have transformed this painting - it's much more complex and intriguing. 





MARCH 16

'Another brick (letter) in the wall....'



City of Glass 47 - (E)



'Another brick (letter) in the wall....'



City of Glass 46 - (L)

In the recent City of Glass paintings, the Tower of Babel, the central image from the novel*, has been neglected....In this piece, each small painting, 25x35cms,  becomes a brick in the Tower. In the spirit of the novel, each 'brick' will contain one of the fifteen letters that spell THETOWEROFBABEL, some obvious, some more obscure. 

Further exploring the blurrings of 'fact' and 'fiction' in the novel and in the series, some of the 'bricks' are based on the street-grid of Manhattan, others are pure invention - they could be part of the grid. It is for the viewer to become detective to make these discoveries....

Manhattan is dismantled, fragmented, rearranged. There is a discipline: if one of the paintings/bricks happens to sell, I am obliged to replace it, find another way to paint the missing letter. 

In this way the piece is renewed, kept fresh. I am looking forward to arranging the finished 'bricks'. Because of the infinite number of combinations, the piece need never appear the same twice. The 'new' Babel in New York may not be necessarily ziggurat-shaped....

This piece is for Geoff Rigden, who sadly passed away recently. Geoff taught me at Canterbury and set me on the road to becoming a painter, He often came to my Open Studios in London, and was very generous and perceptive in his comments about my work, opening my eyes to the possibilities in painting. Although, you don't normally associate 'image' with Geoff's painting, I hope that each individual panel contains something of the serious playfulness of his work. 

The 'bricks' below may change, though I hope by not too much. 



City of Glass 45 - (H)


City of Glass 44 - (F)

City of Glass 43 - (B)

City of Glass 42 - (B)


*'The New York Trilogy', a novel by Paul Auster